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Penn State York Celebrates Grand Opening of New Facility

Photo of the new building
8/26/2005 —

More than 500 people took part in a day of celebration during the grand opening of Penn State York’s new facility on Aug. 25 featuring the Pullo Family Performing Arts Center, the Lee R. Glatfelter Library, and the John T. and Paige S. Smith Atrium.  The festivities began with a donor reception followed by a dedication and ribbon cutting, interactive tours of the buildings, and a free concert to close out the evening.   A number of University and local officials took part in the ceremony. Performers from a variety of local dance and musical groups provided entertainment throughout the afternoon.

View photos of this grand event!

Construction on the 71,000 square foot facility began just over a year and a half ago and completion of the building has been highly anticipated by the campus and community. The $13.2 million facility was constructed primarily with state funding ($11.9 million) through the Department of General Services in Harrisburg.  Additional funding was provided through local donors and the University.

The performing arts center has seating for 1,000 and offers full theater capabilities. Almost 700 seats in the house have been named, with plaques, in recognition of donors.  Students, faculty, staff, visitors, and guests will enjoy the intimacy of a smaller theater with the seating capacity of a larger venue because of the balcony that is part of the architectural design. The Pullo Family Performing Arts Center is a fully equipped theatre with state-of-the-art lighting and sound and one of the largest stage houses in the area. There's a full fly tower which allows the campus to bring in tours and traveling shows of all kinds.

The lower section of the building houses art and much needed general purpose classrooms.   In addition to cultural events, the performing arts center will also be used for commencement, a film series, and a variety of other activities. The performing arts center will also be home to four resident companies - the York Youth Symphony Orchestra, York Junior Symphony Orchestra, York County Honors Choir, and the York County Junior Honors Choir  who will rehearse and perform there.

The library portion of the facility has two separate levels and includes group study rooms, stack space, instructional space, and special collections rooms. More seating space will be available in the new library and visitors will have a spectacular view of Memorial Park, the City of York, campus, and the woods. The library doubles in size from just 9,000 square feet in the old facility to almost 20,000 square feet in the new one.  The library also features its own computer lab.

The performing arts center and the library are connected with an atrium/lobby designed to be open to floors above and below. There will be ample use of glass to take advantage of natural light and the vistas to the north. Sparky and Clark’s, a popular local café, will have a location in the atrium and the café will be open during the day for students, faculty, staff, and visitors as well as during events at the performing arts center.

The Pullo Family Performing Arts Center is named in honor of Robert and Donna Pullo and their family’s lifelong commitment to education, culture, and the arts.  Mr. Pullo has served as a member of the Penn State York Advisory Board and through his work as campaign chairperson,  Penn State York’s fundraising efforts were a tremendous success.

The library is named in honor of the late Lee R. Glatfelter, community leader and volunteer, and in gratitude to Arthur J. Glatfelter, Jr., for his gifts in her memory.   Mr. Glatfelter established the Lee R. Glatfelter Endowment for Project Connections at Penn State York to serve the youth of the York community now and in the future.

The atrium is named to honor benefactor and friends, John T. Smith and the late Paige S. Smith.  Both graduates of Penn State, they established a scholarship in their name as well as the John T. and Paige S. Smith Professorship in science at the campus.   In addition to their donations to York, the Smiths have supported the colleges of agriculture and health and human development, as well as athletics.


The gala premiere event (black tie optional) for the Pullo Family Performing Arts Center is set for Sept. 28 when the Broadway musical 42nd Street takes to the stage.  For tickets and information, visit http://www.pullocenter.yk.psu.edu/ or call 717-505-8900.

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Healing Hearts Through Arts Set for September 23 and 24

8/15/2005 —

An art exhibit, quilt exhibit, and nationally known singer-songwriter Peter Alsop kick off the two-day Healing Hearts Through Arts event Sept. 23 and 24 at Penn State York. The event is in celebration of the second anniversary of Olivia's House, a grief-and-loss center for children in York, and is designed to heighten community awareness of the center's work. The exhibits are open from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday and Alsop performs at 7 p.m. in the Pullo Family Performing Arts Center at the campus. All activities are free to the public.

Healing Hearts Through Arts continues with performances from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday featuring entertainment from area children and teens. Performers include The York College Rhapsody            A capella Chorus, The Southside Steppers, Wanda's Cadettes, Temple of Grace Temple Guards, The Coyle School of Irish Dance, Hanover Ballet Theatre, and Rachel Kinard and Katie Williams.

The afternoon also continues the celebration of the fine arts with the exhibit of area artists. Each piece displayed will be accompanied by the artist's individual story of inspiration. One of the highlights of the event is an exhibit of healing quilts by quilter Jenni Sipe. In conjunction with the event, Olivia's House has launched an art contest to find Olivia's House Artwork of the Year 2005. Professional and nonprofessional artists working in all media may enter photographs, digital printouts or slides of their work to Olivia's House until Sept. 12. The winning entry will be announced at the event. Other features of the event include a raffle for several pieces of art; a "Healing Hearts Coloring Corner" for children; and the Tall Cedars Clowns who will meet and greet families on Saturday afternoon. At 7 p.m., a dramatic play, "Grief Monologues," written, directed, and performed  by local college students will be presented.

Olivia's House opened in September 2003 and is the first independent grief center of its kind in Pennsylvania. Olivia's House offers a variety of programs to assist children and teens through their grief journey. More than 250 families have benefited from the free programs offered through Olivia's House. For more information on Healing Hearts Through Arts and Olivia's House, call Vicki Friedman at 717-699-1133.

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Attention CPAs!

8/12/2005 —
Experienced or advanced tax practitioners looking to update their skills should mark their calendar for Fri., Aug.  19. when Penn State York is offering "Update for CPAs in Tax Practice: Can You Comply with Circular 230?"   This half-day workshop, in the conference center at York is designed for experienced or advanced tax practitioners seeking to update their skills. The workshop is from 8 a.m.  noon, and the cost is $99.  The course fee includes handout and a continental breakfast.   All participants will receive a certificate documenting their four CPE hours.   For more information, contact Bea Landis at 717-771-4192 or bkl1@psu.edu
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Penn State York Adds New Degree for Fall 2005

8/12/2005 —

Penn State York’s new four-year degree in human development and family studies, community human services option, is in place for fall 2005. This new degree, that can be completed without leaving York, offers a program that combines the individual and family development components with human services in the way that other degrees do not.

“This is an excellent degree that will support local agencies and fills a community need,” said Harriet Darling, Ph.D., instructor in human development and family studies and program coordinator. “Our market surveys of students and local agencies pointed us to this degree and the community human services option. Other schools in the region offer social work or behavioral science/sociology degrees but this degree is the only one to combine the individual and family development components with human services. The associate degree we currently offer also fits nicely into this program.”

The bachelor of science degree in human development and family studies is a multidisciplinary program that examines the development of individuals and families across the life span. It enables students to prepare for professional, managerial, or scientific roles in health and human services professions, in public and nonprofit agencies, and in business and industry, as well as for advanced professional or graduate study. Courses emphasize biological, psychological, social/cultural, and economic aspects of development. Through course work and undergraduate internships or research projects, students develop skills relevant to career objectives, such as counseling, human assessment, program planning and evaluation, and research.

The community human services option offered at York is designed to prepare students to enter human services professions. The program also provides excellent preparation for students interested in pursuing graduate study in human development and human services areas. Students typically enter the program with a strong desire to help people. The option combines the theoretical underpinnings of human development across the life span with applied study in real-world settings. Students develop written and oral communication skills throughout the program, acquire contemporary computer skills, and participate in active learning, team-building, and group exercises. The option allows students to become familiar with unique human services needs and organization in Pennsylvania communities, a design that sets the option apart from others. Students who complete the program will be prepared for positions with community human services agencies serving children, adolescents, families, and the aged.

This new degree is one more option for students who are interested in completing a Penn State degree locally. Penn State York will continue to offer eight other four-year degrees: the bachelor of arts in American studies; the bachelor of arts in communication arts and sciences; the bachelor of arts in English; the bachelor of arts in letters, arts, and sciences (liberal studies option); the bachelor of science in business; the bachelor of science in electro-mechanical engineering technology; the bachelor of science in information sciences and technology, the bachelor of science in science; and the first two years of more than 160 Penn State majors. The campus also offers seven associate degrees, a focused master’s degree in teaching and curriculum, and a wide range of professional development and personal enrichment courses.

For information on the bachelor of science degree in human development and family studies, please contact Darling at 717-771-4164 or send an e-mail inquiry to hed4@psu.edu; Sukhdeep Gill, assistant professor of human development and family studies, at 717-771-8406 or sgill@psu.edu; contact the Penn State York Admissions Office at 717-771-4040 or 1-800-PSU-6227.

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Penn State York Offers Fall SAT Preparation Courses

8/9/2005 —

High school students getting ready to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) can find help through two SAT Preparation courses being offered at Penn State York this fall. The two four-session courses for Verbal and Math SAT’s are designed to help students improve their SAT skills. Each class meets in four sessions on four consecutive Saturdays September 10, 17, 24, and October 1 in the Main Classroom Building at the campus.

Students participating in the Preparation for Your Verbal SAT (9:00 – 11:00 a.m.) will review important skills assessed in the verbal section and have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the format and type of questions on the Verbal SAT. Participants will also practice test-taking in simulated exam conditions. Cost for the Preparation for Your Verbal SAT course is $95.

Noel Sloboda, Ph.D., instructor of English at Penn State York, is the course instructor. Sloboda earned his doctorate in English from Washington University. Sloboda was honored recently by the campus with the 2005 James H. Burness Award for Excellence in Teaching. He has received numerous other honors and awards and has been published in “Studies in Humanities.” He is also involved in many language associations and has been a judge for the Lancaster Scholastic Writing Awards. Currently Sloboda is writing a book on Edith Wharton and Gertrude Stein.

Preparation for Your Math SAT (11:05 a.m. – 12:35 p.m.) will familiarize students with the SAT format, and then review SAT math topics including arithmetic, algebra, geometry, graphs, measures and quantitative comparisons. Please bring a calculator to the first class. Cost for the Preparation for Your Math SAT course is $70.

Bruce Babcock, Ph.D., assistant professor of mathematics at Penn State York, is the instructor. Babcock earned a doctorate in mathematics from Michigan State University and is a former winner of the prestigious AMOCO Foundation Outstanding Teaching Award. He was also honored with the Outstanding Teaching Award at Penn State York in 1991 and has authored numerous study guides for the University’s Independent Learning Program.

Register for both sessions at $155 and save $10. The course fee includes the book The Official SAT Study Guide: for the New SAT by the College Board. For a brochure or more information, please call Penn State York at 771-4050 or visit the campus at 1031 Edgecomb Avenue.

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Penn State York's New Library and Performing Arts Center Opens August 25

New Library and Performing Arts Center
8/9/2005 —

August 25 marks an exciting moment in history for Penn State York when the campus unveils its new building featuring the Pullo Family Performing Arts Center, the Lee R. Glatfelter Library and the John T. and Paige S. Smith Atrium.

The day of festivities is free and open to the public. Penn State University President Graham Spanier and a number of other University and local officials, alumni, students, and members of the community will take part in the opening ceremony.

Grand Opening Events Schedule
Time Event
1:00 p.m. Donor Reception
2:00 p.m. Ribbon cutting and dedication
3:00 - 5:00 p.m. Interactive tours of facility
Samples of University Creamery ice cream provided by the alumni!
7:00 p.m. CTO Fifth Avenue, free concert

 

Construction on the 71,000 square foot facility began just over a year ago and completion of the building has been highly anticipated by the campus and community. The $11.9 million facility is being constructed with state funding through the Department of General Services in Harrisburg. The new building overlooks the City of York from the top of the hill on the southside of the campus near the Main Classroom Building.

The performing arts center has seating for 1,000 and will offer full theater capabilities. Students, faculty, staff, visitors, and guests will enjoy the intimacy of a smaller theater with the seating capacity of a larger venue because of the balcony that is part of the architectural design. "We will have a fully equipped theatre with state-of–the-art lighting and sound and one of the largest stage houses in the area. There's a full fly tower which allows us to bring in tours and traveling shows of all kinds," said Steve Haver, director of the Pullo Family Performing Arts Center.  "The campus has already booked 42nd Street the touring Broadway show for September 28 at 8:00 p.m., notes Haver. For ticket information on the performance, contact Haver at 505-8900.

This section of the building will also house art classroom space and offer programming flexibility not currently available on campus. The performing arts center will allow the campus to bring in a variety of entertainment and educational programming that will compliment the offerings of other venues in the area. "We will try to provide cultural and educational experiences to the community that appeal to a wide audience and are not currently available," notes Gumke. In addition to cultural events, the performing arts center will also be used for commencement, a film series, and a variety of other activities. The performing arts center will also be home to four resident companies - the York Youth Symphony Orchestra, York Junior Symphony Orchestra, York County Honors Choir, and the York County Junior Honors Choir – who will rehearse and perform there. The library portion of the facility will be two separate levels and include group study rooms, stack space, instructional space, and special collections rooms. More seating space will be available in the new library and visitors will have a spectacular view of Memorial Park, the City of York, campus, and the woods.

The library doubles in size from just 9,000 square feet in the old facility to almost 20,000 square feet in the new one. "The whole internal environment of the library will be remarkably different than what library users are currently used to," said David B. Van de Streek, assistant librarian at Penn State York. "In addition to a larger, more spread out space, there will be a generous amount of natural light through the library's many windows, and the general acoustics should be far better than those experiences in the old library." The library will also have its own computer lab. The performing arts center and the library are connected with an atrium/lobby space designed to be open to floors above and below. There will be ample use of glass to take advantage of natural light and the vistas to the north. Sparky and Clarks, a popular local café, will have a location in the atrium and the café will be open during the day for students, faculty, staff, and visitors as well as during events at the performing arts center.

In addition to the paid performances in the Pullo Family Performing Arts Center, the campus will continue its free cultural arts series sponsored in part by the York Newspaper Company. Free programs already booked for the performing arts center include Cheryl Wheeler, folk singer, Friday, November 4, 7:30 p.m.; Komplex, Spoken Word Poet, Thursday, January 19, 2006, 7:00 p.m.; Chinua Hawk, R&B singer, Thursday, February 9, 2006, 7:00 p.m.; The Healing Force, Thursday, February 23, 2006, 7:00 p.m.; Great Jazz Divas, Thursday, March 23, 2006, 7:00 p.m.; and Val Mazzenga, The Untold Story, lecture, Thursday, April 6, 2006, 7:00 p.m.

"Penn State York invites students, faculty, staff, and the local community to the opening of this highly anticipated new building," said Dr. Joel M. Rodney, chancellor of Penn State York. "Come and celebrate with us." Lobar Inc., is the general contractor for the project and the architectural firm Murphy and Dittenhafer of York is the design professional for the project. Check out progress on the new building by visiting our live Web cam.

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Penn State York Adds Baseball and Women's Softball

8/9/2005 —

Starting this fall, students at Penn State York will have the opportunity to play two additional varsity sports, baseball and women's softball. This brings the number of varsity sports at the campus to eight including men's and women's basketball, soccer, team tennis, cross-country and women's volleyball. For spring, students are playing an exhibition season in baseball and softball to generate interest and to let high schools know about the new opportunities. This fall, the baseball team will play a full schedule in the newly restructured Penn State University Athletic Conference (PSU-AC). The softball team will plan a full schedule in spring 2006. Students interested in baseball should contact Ronald K. Workinger at 717-771-4036 or rkw2@psu.edu. Students interested in softball should contact Kerry Magni at 717-771-4036 or kam24@psu.edu.

The news of two new sports at the campus comes on the heels of an announcement that starting this fall, students at all Penn State campuses will be eligible to compete in varsity athletics for four full years in the same sport in the PSU-AC. This change adjusts the guidelines of the current Commonwealth Campus Athletic Conference (CCAC) to coincide with the campuses' expansion of degree offerings from two to four years. As a result, athletes will be able to stay with the same sport for four years instead of having to change to a different sport, a requirement that had existed because some of the opponents were two-year schools.

Although Penn State athletics are best known for NCAA Division I competition by University Park teams, intercollegiate competitive opportunities attract an even-higher percentage of undergraduates at the campuses outside University Park. Two of these locations, Penn State Altoona and Penn State Erie, already compete against NCAA Division III teams, while Penn State Berks-Lehigh Valley is on its probationary period at that level.

Another 13 Penn State campuses -- Abington, Beaver, Delaware County, DuBois, Fayette, Hazleton, McKeesport, Mont Alto, New Kensington, Schuylkill, Wilkes-Barre, Worthington Scranton and York -- plus Penn College belong to the CCAC. Penn State Harrisburg is expected to join them in the PSU-AC in the near future.

These teams currently compete in 10 sports: men's and women's basketball, women's volleyball, baseball, men's and women's cross country, golf, men's soccer, team tennis and softball. This move builds on a two-year pilot program where four-year eligibility had been expanded to men's basketball, women's volleyball and team tennis. For information on the wide range of athletic opportunities at Penn State York, call Kerry Magni, athletic director, at 717-771-4036.

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